5 Things Every Cyclist Should Stockpile

lotto_service_courseSadly we can’t all have our own private pro cycling service course, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t have a personal stash of cycling supplies that will always come in handy (especially right before a big ride). Our list of gear to stockpile certainly doesn’t cover everything – so post a comment below with what’s on your list!

1. Inner Tubes

You can never have enough of these. You never know when a flat will strike, and you don’t want to get stuck with a flat tire and no way to fix it. Always carry at least one when you ride, and have a few on hand at home.

 

You can never have enough inner tubes at home. No, seriously. You can never actually have enough.

You can never have enough inner tubes at home. No, seriously. You can never actually have enough.

2. Nutrition

Having a good assortment of gels, chews, bars, and hydration mix at home makes it easy to always stay all fueled up on a ride. Just grab something from the cupboard and go.

We're big fans of the Honey Stinger waffle

We’re big fans of the Honey Stinger waffle

3. Chains

This seems like kind of a weird one, but we’ve had more than a few chains randomly snap on us on a ride (ok, maybe it wasn’t so random—they were probably well past their wear life anyway). Having a chain or two on hand can limit the amount of time your bike is down.

If you've got a few miles on your current chain, you might want to have one or two on hand

If you’ve got a few miles on your current chain, you might want to have one or two on hand

 

4. Cassette

Most cassettes are pretty much toast after about 1,500-3,000 miles, depending on how often you clean your drivetrain. Cassettes can be kind of expensive, so when we spot a good deal on them (watch your inbox for Bike Nashbar emails!), we like to pick up one or two whether we need them right then or not. Afterall, eventually it will need to be replaced, so why not save some money and be secure in the knowledge you have a spare on hand.

 

Cassettes tend to be kind of costly, so if you find a great deal on them (watch your email, folks), it probably not a bad idea to get one or two

Cassettes tend to be kind of costly, so if you find a great deal on them (watch your email, folks), it probably not a bad idea to get one or two

5. Saddle

Did you find the saddle you absolutely love? Buy another one. We’re not kidding. At some point the manufacturer is going to change the shape, design, or just stop making it all together. This can be a traumatic event in the life of any cyclist. But you can lessen the impact by having a second one on hand, ready to swoop in and save your behind when your old saddle finally bites the dust after years of loyal use (or a crash).

Have you found The One? Safeguard your new-found comfort by having a backup saddle

Have you found The One? Safeguard your new-found comfort by having a backup saddle

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26 comments on “5 Things Every Cyclist Should Stockpile
  1. JoAnn says:

    Those little presta to schrader pump adapters. Because one day you’ll get a flat and find that your presta-equipped bike mounted pump flew off your bike and your riding partner or local gas station only has a schrader.

    Also, those little “shots of air” are handy.

  2. Jonathan Chambers says:

    Number 4 is an outright lie!! If you change your chain regularly your cassette can last for years.

  3. Barry says:

    disagree with some of this- cassettes are always on sale and they last longer that you think. Saddles not an issue when you ride a recumbent. and again, chains last longer than you think if they are maintained

  4. Tom Stricklin says:

    1500 to 3000 for a cassette, so I’m changing my tires and my cassettes about the same time? Come on, you want to give advise, you shouldn’t try to bullshit us. I keep my bike very clean.

  5. Remember that rubber can degrade over time, keep no more than a 2 year supply of tubes on hand. Same with tires.
    Also keep an eye on expiration dates of your bars, they do expire, and you may not want to keep them after that date.

    • Tom Nyzio says:

      Butyl tubes last for years if they’re kept in their boxes at room temperature. I don’t think I’ve ever seen one go bad solely due to age.

  6. JD says:

    Interesting, stockpiling for me usually refers to those inexpensive things that you just never happen to have on hand when you need one, hence the need to buy a box of them. Tubes and CO2 cartridges fit that category. Drivetrain parts do not.

  7. Jason Rico says:

    spare shoe cleats.
    Rim strips
    Valve cores
    Chain pins
    Seat collar

    These are all things that can fail and leave you unable to ride.

    • Bruce H McIntosh says:

      Heh… cleats is a good idea. I have had a cleat fail halfway through a 55 mile ride and it’s no fun at all, at all, when you just can’t lock in. 🙂

  8. Brian Knoblauch says:

    I’ve got a pretty good bike shop just a short walk down the street from my house, and of course Nashbar has fast shipping for things the local shop doesn’t carry! Therefore, my stockpile of repair parts is basically just the spare tube that I carry on rides. 🙂

  9. Glenn says:

    Disagree on #4. I have at least 10K on the cassette and I spoke to the bike mechanic and he said I still have a lot of life left in it. Clean your chain, crank, and cassette after every 100 miles and use a superior chain oil and it will last a lot longer than 1,300 miles.

  10. Brandon Mascarenas says:

    Everyone is going crazy over the cassette statement. Have you all forgot who posted the blog! A bike store and they want your money!!

  11. Weston says:

    Cyclists should know to stock up on tubes, tires, cables, chain/quick links, and beer/cannabis.

  12. cuira says:

    Every cyclist should have a chain measuring device on hand. If you change your change at .75, your cassette and chain rings will last.

  13. cuira says:

    While I’m at it. Every rider should have a patch kit; know how to use it and a plan to repurpose innertubes, when they’re beyond patching

  14. Tony says:

    Just have a spare bike, so you can wait for new parts.

  15. k.mays says:

    Heavy riders that ride hilly terrain tear through chains

  16. Danny says:

    Cable ends, CO2, shift/brake cables, master links, chain lube, patch kit/tubes, presta valves.

  17. Dharma Dog says:

    A 3-year supply of tires is good to have, since tires can age (the rubber gets harder, less likely to pick up glass and puncture). You want to keep them in a cool, dry place. The only problem, though, is when research show that fatter tires with less air are just as fast (if not faster on rough roads) and more comfortable. So now I have to use up my stock of 23mm tires while I wait for my growing stock of 25’s and 28’s to age.

  18. Dave says:

    My list:

    3-4 inner tubes of each size that I use (at least one spare on the bike)

    One spare tire for each type of bike 700×25, 700×32 and 26×2.1

    Spare chains in 7sp, 9sp and 10sp

    2-4 cables of each type brake, shift, road and MTB and a few feet of each appropriate housing, ferrules and cable caps

    One or two sets of brake pads of each type

    An extra one each of my preferred road and a MTB saddles

  19. Dennis voorhees says:

    Rear Derailleur hanger. They break and it can take several days or more to get a replacement.

  20. Andy says:

    I would add chainrings along with cassettes.

  21. Matt says:

    + cleats
    + derailleur hangers

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